By Tian Dayton, Ph.D., Psychologist, Author, Psychodramatist, Senior Fellow at The Meadows

Grief that is out in the open, that is part of the natural cycle of life or part of one of life’s tragic circumstances has a dignity to it. The person experiencing a loss feels that they have a right to grieve and to accept caring and attention from those they love.

Published in Blog Articles
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What’s Love Got To Do With It?

By Jean Collins LCSW, LISAC, CSAT, Executive Director of Rio Retreat Center at The Meadows

What is love addiction and love avoidance and what does it have to do with love anyway? For women who struggle with self-defeating relationship patterns, things can get very muddy in this area. Fortunately for women whose lives have become unmanageable, Willow House at The Meadows offers an intimate inpatient treatment experience to help them regain control.

Published in Blog Articles

By Alexandra Katehakis, Ph.D.(c), MFT, CST-S, CSAT-S, Senior Fellow at The Meadows

For decades, researchers have struggled to define the unconscious processes of irrational love paramount in myths and fairy tales. Lovers in these stories are portrayed as love struck, driven to tantrums or immature behavior, wholly bewitched by the spell of the beloved. The psychologically tormented, unstable duo is incapable of secure, mature love, rendering them unable to function until they are driven to insanity and, at times, even to death.

Published in Blog Articles

By Dan Griffin, MA, Senior Fellow at The Meadows

When I went to school to learn how to work with people with addictive disorders I got a lot of great guidance: Brain science. Family systems. Motivational Interviewing. Models of Change. Working with the criminal justice population. Working with women. Cultural influences on addiction and recovery.

Published in Blog Articles

By Shahida Arabi, M.A., Author

“Many abused children cling to the hope that growing up will bring escape and freedom. But the personality formed in the environment of coercive control is not well adapted to adult life. The survivor is left with fundamental problems in basic trust, autonomy, and initiative. She approaches the task of early adulthood - establishing independence and intimacy - burdened by major impairments in self-care, in cognition and in memory, in identity, and in the capacity to form stable relationships. She is still a prisoner of her childhood; attempting to create a new life, she reencounters the trauma.”
– Judith Herman, Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence – from Domestic Violence to Political Terror

Published in Blog Articles
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